Garden Planning

“Live the full life of the mind, exhilarated by new ideas, intoxicated by the romance of the unusual.” – Ernest Hemingway

It’s January! Gardening may seem like the farthest thought on your mind. But, it’s actually where the garden process begins. In Michigan, we’re several months away from putting new plants and seeds into the ground! There’s a lot to be done right now to prep and plan for your next growing season!

  1. Check your seed inventory. If you’re concerned about the age of your seed, you may conduct a simple seed viability test. You can do this quite easily by taking a small sample of your seed and putting it in a plastic bag with a moist-wet paper towel. Leave it in a warm spot and check it every couple of days to see if the seeds are sprouting.
  2. Begin scouring seed catalogs.
  3. Inventory seed-starting supplies such as potting soil, starting trays, cell-packs and pots, etc.
  4. Perhaps seek out and join a local garden club.
  5. Visit your local public library and borrow how-to gardening books?
  6. Even though planting is likely several months away, it’s never too early to start planning your garden space and beds! All you need are measurements for the space you have, graph paper, and a pen or pencil. Sketch out your garden space and start filling in what you want to grow. Research companion planting, row spacing, and site selection (full sun is often best for veggies). Take a look at yields, too, and decide how many of each plant you want to grow. By considering and planning these things now, you’ll know how many seeds and starting plants you’ll need to purchase for your garden.
  7. Lastly, have fun!

Rams: A Lesson in Tough Love

Sheepy Hollow Farm

Why do you suppose a ram, a male sheep, is called a ram?

ram  (rm) n.

1. A male sheep.
2. Any of several devices used to drive, batter, or crush by forceful impact, especially:

a. A battering ram.
b. The weight that drops in a pile driver or steam hammer.
c. The plunger or piston of a force pump or hydraulic press.
3. A hydraulic ram.
They say a picture paints a thousand words…
 
The good news…neither bad boy has ever ‘rammed’ me! The shed roof is almost  5-feet above the ground. I have springy sheep! Grrrrrrr….
This is my lovely ram’s shed, a snap-shot of recent rams’ destructive PLAY… a display perhaps of boredom?  What else do rams have to do??? In spite of the best of care, their antics never cease to aMu$e me (and my pocketbook). You see, I have two Shetland rams: senior 3-year-old and…

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