Holiday treats… simple horderves with goat cheese

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a simple little pleasure…

The right tool for the right job makes ALL the difference to the craftsman!

For instance, my gizmo for hang-drying (separating the curd from the whey) my soft cheese…BEFORE:

For several years, this has been my make-do cheese draining apparatus: butter muslin containing the soft cheese, suspended from a wood dowel between two boxes of pasta. ( BTW, you can only use the pasta boxes so many times before they finally ‘give whey’ – pun intended! – to the weight of the cheese!)

Thanks to handy-man hubby, my AFTER cheese drying apparatus:

 

A simple block of scrap wood ( I still want to apply some mineral oil to the surface), specially made to fit over the lip of my SS pot!

It  doesn’t take much to make this old gal HAPPY!

farm fresh cheesecake + strawberries

When you have a surplus of fresh goat’s milk… make cheese for…

… a ‘traditional’ cheesecake, and

…serve with just-picked strawberries from the garden!

How-To: ‘Modified’ traditional cheesecake recipe {made with my goat cheese}:

First, make a graham-cracker crust: 2-cups cracker crumbs, 1/4-cup sugar, 1/2-cup melted butter; press crumbs into bottom of 10-inch spring-pan. Refrigerate.

Filling: Cream 16-oz. chevre goat cheese and about 15-oz. ricotta (made from 1-gal goat’s milk). Gradually add 1-1/2 cups sugar, 2 teaspoons vanilla and 1/2-teaspoon salt. Add 6-egg yolks (one at a time) saving egg whites. (You can add lemon zest if desired.) Blend in 1/3-cup flour. Beat egg whites until stiff, not dry, and fold into cheese mixture. Pour into pan and bake at 350 degree F for about 1-hour and 15 minutes. Cool; chill thoroughly before serving.

While it’s baking in the oven, stitch-up a few sachets from fabric ‘scraps’, stencil with numbers (just because??) and fill with lovely  lavender!

A sweet gift for a friend!

Happy Day!