farm fresh cheesecake + strawberries

When you have a surplus of fresh goat’s milk… make cheese for…

… a ‘traditional’ cheesecake, and

…serve with just-picked strawberries from the garden!

How-To: ‘Modified’ traditional cheesecake recipe {made with my goat cheese}:

First, make a graham-cracker crust: 2-cups cracker crumbs, 1/4-cup sugar, 1/2-cup melted butter; press crumbs into bottom of 10-inch spring-pan. Refrigerate.

Filling: Cream 16-oz. chevre goat cheese and about 15-oz. ricotta (made from 1-gal goat’s milk). Gradually add 1-1/2 cups sugar, 2 teaspoons vanilla and 1/2-teaspoon salt. Add 6-egg yolks (one at a time) saving egg whites. (You can add lemon zest if desired.) Blend in 1/3-cup flour. Beat egg whites until stiff, not dry, and fold into cheese mixture. Pour into pan and bake at 350 degree F for about 1-hour and 15 minutes. Cool; chill thoroughly before serving.

While it’s baking in the oven, stitch-up a few sachets from fabric ‘scraps’, stencil with numbers (just because??) and fill with lovely  lavender!

A sweet gift for a friend!

Happy Day!

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “farm fresh cheesecake + strawberries

  1. Looks yummy!…so love the sachets…enjoy your day!…it sure is a beautiful one here in Indiana.

  2. I made chocolate cheese cake last Monday using my goat cheese too, instead of cream cheese! I got the recipe from http://www.saramoulton.com. I really like her recipes. I bought some letter stencils from crafts 2000 and am going to try some stenciling on my moth repellent sachets. I’ll post a picture when I’m done. My lavender is starting to bloom, I have Grosso and Provence.

    • Mmmmmm… chocolate cheese cake! I’ll have to visit Sara’s recipes too!

      Depending on the size of the stencil, I find the little sponge-type roller works really well! Also, rubber wood-block stamps (letters and simple images) work well with a little acrylic or fabric paint evenly brushed onto the stamp with a paint brush. Can’t wait to see your results!

      Grosso hasn’t performed well for me here over the years. I find munstead and hidcote very hardy and more suitable to my growing conditions. 😀

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s